Content Curation: Scoop.it and Other Great Ways to Share

We’ve been talking about what content curation is, why you should be doing it, and how to set up your content curation machine. Today we’re going to wrap up the content curation discussion by talking about the best ways to share curated content with your audience. If you’ve been following along, you should be curating content from at least 3 different sources by now – Twitter Search, Google Alerts, and an RSS Reader. Now that you have all of this great information, how do you get it to your audience? Let’s look at three ways you can share. Manual Sharing on Social Media Sites Perhaps the most obvious option for sharing your curated content is to scroll through the results, copy the ones you like, and paste them into Hootsuite to send out to your various social media networks. This is doable, but suffers from disadvantages of being time consuming, not very organized, and having a limited reach. As fast as all of the social media network feeds move, you will be lucky if a good percentage of your audience sees the valuable information you’ve found for them if you are simply tweeting it out, or sharing it on other networks. This is not to say you shouldn’t use this method. Twitter especially is a place where people love to find good links. (In fact, you’re finding a lot there in your content curation!) But you shouldn’t rely on this method alone. You can also share your curated content on your blog. In fact, some blogs are made up of nothing but curated content. I don’t recommend this, however,...

Content Curation in 3 Easy Steps

Last time we talked about what content curation is, and why you should care. Now that you care, let’s talk about the easiest ways to curate content. I’m going to start with the easy ways because there are an ever-growing number of tools and services you can use to curate content. So it’s impossible to cover every potential place you could go or method you could use. The advantage to what I’m going to show you today is that (1) it’s easy, (2) it’s fast, and (3) it’s the entry level stuff that every online business owner should be doing. Before we get started on how to set up your content curation system, let’s review the “why” again real quick. Your purpose in curating content is to provide your audience with the best, most up-to-date, and highly relevant information on your market that there is. Your goal is to find the sources that have the best content already gathered. Unless you want to work full time at content curation – which of course you don’t – you’ve got to find the quickest way to get this done without compromising quality. You can get started with effective content curation in 3 easy steps. ?Step 1:?Twitter Search Twitter is a great place to curate content. There’s a lot of quality content there. The key to doing it effectively is to identify what keywords are relevant to your market. This requires having patience and playing around with it a little bit. Identify 2-3 keywords or keyword phrases and set them up as Twitter searches. Keep the 1-2 searches that are returning the...

What is Content Curation and Why You Should Care

Content curation is hugely important to your online business. And its importance will only continue to grow. When I talk with people about whether and how they are curating content, I find that many don’t understand how to curate content. And a good number of people don’t even know what content curation?means. So today we’re going to start from the beginning and talk about the what and why of content curation. Then next time I’ll share with you some of the easiest and most effective methods of content curation. What is Content Curation? Content curation escapes any exact definition but I’ll give it a try. Content curation is the discovery, selection, organization and sharing of the best and most relevant content on any given topic. The content involved is usually articles, but can (and should) include videos, photos, infographics, and podcasts. Once the content is found, selected and organized, it can be shared in a variety of ways. Most commonly, curators share the content on their blog, in a their email newsletter, on social media networks, and/or in a virtual newspaper-type publication such as Paper.ly or Scoop.it. It is also worth mentioning what content curation is not, as there is a lot of that going on too. Putting someone else’s content on your blog, in whole or in part, without giving the original creator credit, is not curation. It’s stealing. Even publishing someone’s entire article on your site and giving them credit, without their permission, is not okay. Finally, just pulling together a bunch of links and publishing them is not good content curation. The point of content curation...